Stepping Into Wartime
Cannock Chase & Hednesford Town Park
Staffordshire

As a part of Staffordshire's commemoration of the Centenary of The Great War the County organised the "Stepping Into Wartime" event.

Cannock Chase was the site of two massive training camps for recruits in the first world war.  These camps - Brocton Camp and Rugeley Camp) were designed to hold over 20,000 soldiers each.  Each camp was a self-contained town, complete with churches, cinema etc.

Groups of young people were taken along the route, taken by the recruits one hundred years earlier, from the Great War Hut near the Visitor's Centre to the Park in Hednesford Town, close to the railway station.

Rich in History manned some of the information points along the route, highlighting and explaining the significant points along the route.

At Hednesford Park a display of equipment, kit and rifles was staged by Rich in History staff, with members of the public able to handle the items on display and talk about the artifacts and the history of the period.

  • Stepping Into Wartime Stepping Into Wartime Hednesford Park
  • Stepping Into Wartime Stepping Into Wartime A group of young people travelling between the camp and Hednesford
  • Stepping Into Wartime Stepping Into Wartime A group of young people travelling between the camp and Hednesford
  • Stepping Into Wartime Stepping Into Wartime A group of young people travelling between the camp and Hednesford
  • Stepping Into Wartime Stepping Into Wartime A group of young people travelling between the camp and Hednesford
  • Stepping Into Wartime Stepping Into Wartime A group of young people travelling between the camp and Hednesford
  • Stepping Into Wartime Stepping Into Wartime

 


To have a presenter spend a full day at your school can cost from as little as £200,
with morning or afternoon sessions starting from £125 per session.

Please contact us on 01902 727037,
or email us for more details and to discuss your personalised requirements.
 

 

 

 
                 
                 
                 
                 
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